The Buzz in Utah on the Effect of Pesticides on Wild Bees

Humans and honeybees go way back. We’ve been raiding their hives for honey for at least 10,000 years, and we domesticated them almost 5,000 years ago. Honey bees are the most commonly used pollinator for commercial crops in the United States. But there is another bee story; the decline of wild bees.

Ultimately, it may be the more alarming story. There are over 20,000 bee species in the world, and 43 percent of them are diminishing or endangered. Most wild bees are small and solitary, nesting in holes in the ground or wood. Solitary bees face different, less understood, challenges from pesticide exposure than their colony-dwelling honeybee cousins.

In a report published last week in Environmental Entomology, Utah State University graduate student Andi Kopi and Theresa Pitts-Singer, Ph.D., of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service make the case that we need to look beyond honeybees when assessing how pesticides affect pollinators. When it comes to pesticides, we typically only check their effects on honeybees before authorizing their use, even though solitary bees may interact with these chemicals in very different ways.

The factors affecting wild bee populations are the same as those responsible for the death of honeybee colonies. It’s not just one thing, but three factors intersecting that have caused the population to diminish. It’s this interaction between pesticides, poor nutrition, and diseases and parasites that is, in fact, bringing bees populations down.

Wild bees are ecologically critical. Worldwide, more than 1,000 plant-produced food, beverages, fibers, spices, and medicines need to be pollinated. Our pollinators have enough environmental stressors, curbing the use of bird and bee-killing pesticides should be a national priority.


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Mississippi Honey Bee Stewardship Program

The protection of the honey bee has been a popular topic of conversation in recent years. While research into colony collapse disorder (CCD) continues, several stakeholders in Mississippi have collaborated to form the Mississippi Honey Bee Stewardship Program. The participants include beekeeper associations, agricultural consultants, and Mississippi State University Extension Service, just to name a few. We asked Tyler Smith to talk about the Mississippi Honey Bee Stewardship Program.

 

 

For more information on CCD and the Mississippi Honey Bee Stewardship Program, check out the rest of Tyler Smith’s class on Pollinator Stewardship!

You'll find this and more at Certified Training Institute's Pesticide Division. Click the button below, choose your state and get started today!


Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

Online state-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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Myth: Colony Losses Are Strongly Correlated To The Use Of Neonicotinoids

The use of pesticides has received a lot of blame for honey bee decline in the press, specifically neonicotinoids. Seed treatments are often used to protect seedlings from feeding insects. We asked our honey bee specialist Jeff Harris about the use of neonicotinoids as related to honey bee decline.

For more information on the health, stewardship, and myths surrounding honey bees, check out the rest of Jeff’s class titled Balancing Pest Management and Pollinator Health.

You'll find this and more by visiting Certified Training Institutes Pesticide Division. Click the button below, choose your state and get started today! 


Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

Online state-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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Myth: If Honey Bees Go Extinct, Humans Will Die Within Days To Weeks

There has been a fair amount of alarming press coverage regarding the decline of the honey bee population and the effect the lack of pollinators will have on the agricultural industry and food availability. Reports have been dire, to say the least. We asked our honey bee specialist Jeff Harris to talk about myth and the pollination sources of the world’s leading food crops.

 

 

For more information on the health, stewardship, and myths surrounding honey bees, check out the rest of Jeff’s class titled Balancing Pest Management and Pollinator Health. You'll find this and more at Certified Training Institute's Pesticide Division. Click the button below, choose your state and get started today!

 


Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

Online state-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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Aquatic Weed Control

Water features (manmade or natural) can add beauty and depth to any landscape. However, water features and ponds come with their own set of weeds. As with all weeds, the first step to management is identification. Mis-identification can result in a lot of wasted time and money. We asked our aquatic weed specialist, Gray Turnage, to talk a little bit about the importance of weed identification.

 

 

Check out the rest of Gray’s class!    

You'll find this and more at Certified Training Institute's Pesticide Division. Click the button below, choose your state and get started today!


Pesticide Professional Continuing Education

Online state-approved video continuing education courses are available 24/7.

 

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